Gyeongbokgung Palace – Best Place To Visit In Seoul

Gyeongbokgung Palace

Built in 1395, Gyeongbokgung Palace is also commonly referred to as the Northern Palace because its location is furthest north when compared to the neighboring palaces of Changdeokgung (Eastern Palace) and Gyeongheegung (Western Palace) Palace. Gyeongbokgung Palace is arguably the most beautiful, and remains the largest of all five palaces.

The premises were once destroyed by fire during the Imjinwaeran War (Japanese Invasion, 1592-1598). However, all of the palace buildings were later restored under the leadership of Heungseondaewongun during the reign of King Gojong (1852-1919).

Remarkably, the most representative edifices of the Joseon Dynasty, Gyeonghoe-ru Pavilion and Hyangwonjeong Pond, have remained relatively intact. Woldae and the sculptures of Geunjeongjeon (The Royal Audience Chamber) represent past sculptures of contemporary art.

The National Palace Museum of Korea is located south of Heungnyemun Gate, and the National Folk Museum is located on the eastern side within Hyangwonjeong.

A new street called taegeukgi-gil (literally “Korean flag street”) has been developed on one of Hyoja-dong’s streets, where a total of 240 flags will be flown along the street near Gyeongbokgung Palace. A similar street can be found in front of Cheongwadae (the Blue House, or presidential residence). The street was created to mark the nation’s 70th anniversary and victory over Japan, which liberated Korea from Japanese occupation. The display of the taegeukgi will be put up on March 1 in remembrance of the March 1st Movement, also known as the Sam-il Movement, one of the earliest public displays of Korean resistance during the Japanese occupation of Korea. The flags will be taken down at the end of the year.

How To Go There:

Subway
Gyeongbokgung Palace Station (Seoul Subway Line 3), Exit 5

OR,
Gwanghwamun Station (Seoul Subway Line 5), Exit 2